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Would you agree with this litmus test for Biblical Theology?

 

  "If you ever encounter a theology that doesn't directly connect the greatness of God with your potential to do great things on his behalf, it's not biblical theology."

 

 

Tags: Biblical, Theology

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I'd probably want to see it fleshed out a bit and put into a larger context.

Daniel

to the op:
nope. but that's just because of the ambiguity in the statement. taken one way, that there won't be biblical theology. that there would be humanism. taken in another sense with a different context, the statement could mean something like John Piper's Christian hedonism but still doesn't make it a test for biblical theology.

but in the context of most people, It reads of Rick Warrenesque theology where it's only theology if it's something that will benefit me.

The greatest of biblical theology is that which connects the greatness of God with our inability to do anything for God. This doesn't fit into the statement but is considered biblical theology. I guess you could say that with this particular situation, that statement is falsified.
There is not necessarily any particular correlation between Biblical theology and our ability or inability to do things on God's behalf. Biblical theology is theology that is based on the texts of Scripture and whose interpretation seeks to draw out of the text (i.e. exegesis) what God is saying to us.
No.

One might agree or disagree with the statement.
I'd want to get clarification on "directly connect."
"Your potential to do great things on his behalf" is problematic, depending on where you want to go with this. He achieves great things through His unworthy people, but I'm not sure this is the same thing that the statement says.

Mostly, though, I can't see how this is any kind of "litmus test."

More than mostly, your OP seems equivocal. Are you asking about Biblical Theology, a la your first line, or are you talking about theology that is biblical, which is what your quote seems to refer to?
No, Biblical theology is based on the theology of the Bible, which is God manifesting his glory through the Son and by the Spirit. It is about the revelation of God. Christ is at the very foundation of Biblical theology yet noticeably absent in the OP.
My potential is zero. Apart from me you can do nothing
I can do all things through Him. It doesn't mean I will do anything and He surely doesn't need me to do them either. He is glorified in using weak and foolish people to accomplish things, so in scraping the bottom of the barrel, he might just use me.
some context to the quote can be found here:

Sun-Stand-Still-by-Steven-Furtick-Chapter-1

you can find it within this block:

"You could think of this book as a one-volume theology of audacity. You probably don’t have one of those yet, but it’s essential. In fact, if you ever encounter a theology that doesn’t directly con- nect the greatness of God with your potential to do great things on his behalf, it’s not biblical theology. File it under Heresy. I’ll take that further: if you’re not daring to believe God for the impossible, you’re sleeping through some of the best parts of your Christian life"

looking at it from the writer's perspective and what he wants to do, i give him... poetic license. That also means i probably won't take him seriously.
God already did the impossible. He doesn't have to prove anything. It comes down to believing God for what is yet unseen. The majority of the church history is written in the faithfulness of men who persisted in the realm of the possible: raising a family, working hard, being faithful to their spouse, and contributing to the work of the kingdom. No miracles, no signs and no wonders. Yes it's boring and it won't sell any books, but I suspect it allowed Furtick the time to write this one.
Jonathan, I didn't know where the quote came from. Thanks for finding the source. A friend sent it to me and it just sent my spidey senses aflutter.
I don’t want this to become about a person, but the question is still the same. Is the statement truly a litmus test of a theology to affirm its biblical roots? Or is it the test itself heresy (taking the opposing position of the author)?
.
I think the author is using hyperbole to bolster a contention that believers demonstrate a lack of faith because they don't trust God for something greater. I didn't see that until Jonathan posted the context. I wouldn't bother trying to make it some theological benchmark one way or the other. It's badly stated.


Steve said:
Jonathan, I didn't know where the quote came from. Thanks for finding the source. A friend sent it to me and it just sent my spidey senses aflutter.
I don’t want this to become about a person, but the question is still the same. Is the statement truly a litmus test of a theology to affirm its biblical roots? Or is it the test itself heresy (taking the opposing position of the author)?
.

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